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Non-dairy Milks & Creams

 

almond milk   Shopping hints:  Look for this in aseptic containers. To make your own:   Put 1 cup blanched almonds into a blender and grind into a fine meal. Add 3 tablespoons honey or maple syrup and 1 teaspoon vanilla, then gradually add 2 cups water while blender is running. Strain out and discard almond pulp.  See also the recipe for Almond Milk posted on www.vegweb.comSubstitutes:  rice milk   Cooking notes:  Shake well before using!

coconut butter  To make your own:  Toast grated coconut over low heat in a frying pan until lightly browned, then whirl it (while still hot) in a blender until it has the consistency of a smooth paste.

coconut cream (Don't confuse this with cream of coconut) Where to find:  Asian markets To make your own:  Squeeze liquid from freshly grated coconut through a damp cloth, let cream rise to the top OR let canned (thick, not artificially emulsified) coconut milk stand and separate, use thicker cream at top   Substitutes:   coconut milk OR light coconut milk OR 1 C cream + teaspoon coconut extract OR cream

coconut milk    Notes:  This is available in liquid form (in cans or aseptic containers), frozen, and as a powder. Don't confuse coconut milk with  coconut water, which is the liquid found in the center of a fresh coconut, or with the sweetened cream of coconut powder used in mixed drinks. Varieties: Light (or "lite") coconut milk has less fat and about a quarter of the calories of the regular version, but doesn't taste nearly as rich. You can reduce the fat (and calories) in a can of regular coconut milk by letting it settle, and then skimming and discarding some of the thick coconut cream off the top. Lighten what's left even more by diluting it with water or chicken broth. Where to find it: Asian foods section of many supermarkets  
To make your own: Combine equal parts boiling water and chopped coconut, allow to sit for one hour, then strain through cheesecloth or a kitchen towel. Discard coconut pulp. Substitutes: coconut cream (richer-tasting, but higher in highly saturated coconut oil) OR one cup milk plus teaspoon coconut extract (This substitution works fairly well in heavily seasoned Southeast Asian dishes and is much lower in fat.) OR Mix in a blender at high speed: One cup chopped coconut plus one cup hot water or milk OR Bring to a boil one cup dried coconut plus one cup water, cool, mix in a blender at high speed, then strain to desired consistency OR Combine one part powdered coconut cream plus four parts hot milk OR Combine one part powdered coconut cream plus four parts hot water. 

coconut water = coconut juice  To make your own:  Drain liquid from the center of a whole fresh coconut.

cream of coconut  Notes:  Don't confuse this with coconut cream, which is used in Asian dishes.  Cream of coconut is thick and very sweet, and commonly used in mixed drinks.  Where to find it:  liquor stores, available in liquid and powdered forms.  Substitutes:   sweetened condensed milk with coconut extract to taste

 

horchata  Notes:  This is a Spanish beverage made with rice, almonds, or chufa.   Horchatas sold in markets are often flavored with chocolate, cinnamon, or fruit.  Varieties:  Hispanic stores often carry almond horchata = horchata de almendra, chufa horchata = horchata de chufa,  the traditional Spanish version, and rice horchata = horchata de arrozTo make your own:   Soak one cup uncooked rice in 6 cups hot water for at least 2 hours, then simmer for 20 minutes. Puree in a blender, then strain. Add one teaspoon vanilla and 1/2 cup sugar.  See also this recipe for horchata.


light coconut milk = lite coconut milk  Substitutes:  equal parts coconut milk and water OR regular coconut milk (higher in highly saturated coconut oil)

nondairy topping  Notes:  Cool Whip and Dream Whip are popular brands.  Some of these products may include casein.  

oat milk   Shopping notes:  This comes in aseptic containers.  A fortified version is available that supplies many of the nutrients normally found in cow's milk.  Substitutes:  cow's milk (less expensive and more nutritious, but its production involves the exploitation of animals) OR goat's milk (less expensive, more nutritious, exploits animals) OR soy milk (best used in baked goods; doesn't work well in many savory dishes) OR rice milk (sweeter than oat milk, best used in desserts) OR almond milk (also sweeter; use it only in desserts)  Cooking notes:  Shake well before using!  Links:  Here's  a recipe for oat milk.

 

rice milk   Shopping hints:  Look for this in aseptic containers.  Some varieties are gluten-free; others are not.  A common brand is Rice Dream.  To make your own:  See the recipe for Rice Milk posted on www.vegweb.com.   Substitutes:  almond milk (Like rice milk, this works well in most desserts.) OR horchata OR cow's milk (less expensive and more nutritious, but its production involves the exploitation of animals) OR goat's milk (less expensive, more nutritious, exploits animals) OR oat milk (more versatile that rice milk; works well in both sweet and savory dishes) OR soy milk (best used in baked goods; doesn't work well in many savory dishes)  Cooking notes:  Shake well before using!

 

 

soy milk = soymilk = soy beverage = soya milk = soya beverage   Notes:    Made from soybeans, soy milk is sweeter and darker than dairy milk, and it has a distinctive beanlike flavor.  It comes refrigerated, or in aseptic containers (either full strength or concentrated), or in powdered form, with varying percentages of fat.  A fortified version is available that supplies many of the nutrients normally found in cow's milk. Flavored versions are best for drinking, unflavored for cooking.  Shake well before using.  To make your own:   Here's a recipe for soy milk.   Substitutes:  cow's milk (less expensive and more nutritious, but its production involves the exploitation of animals) OR goat's milk (less expensive, more nutritious, exploits animals) OR oat milk (more versatile that soy milk; works well in both sweet and savory dishes) OR rice milk (sweeter than soy milk, best used in desserts) OR almond milk (also sweeter; use it only in desserts)

 

 


Copyright 1996-2005 Lori Alden