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Beef Round Cuts

The round is a kind term for the rear end of the carcass.  Those muscles are well exercised, so round cuts tends to be a bit tougher and leaner than cuts from the loin.  Round cuts do well if they're cooked with moist heat, and many of them can also be roasted, as long as they're not overcooked.  

Cuts:

bottom round  Notes:   The bottom round is usually divided into two smaller cuts:  the bottom round roast and the rump roast.  

bottom round roast   Notes:   These roasts are cut from the bottom round.  Some people roast them in the oven, but they're a bit tough and work better as pot roasts.    Substitutes:  rump roast OR arm roast OR shoulder roast

eye round roast = eye of the round   Notes:  This boneless roast looks like a choice tenderloin, but it's much tougher.  It's best to cook it very slowly using moist heat.   A steak cut from this roast is an eye round steak.   Substitutes:  rump roast

eye round steak = eye steak = eye of round steak    Notes:  This is a small, boneless steak cut from an eye round roast.  It's tough, so it's sometimes cut into stew meat or processed into cube steak.  It's also good braised, but it will require the tenderizing effects of a marinade if you want to grill or broil it.  If cut thinly, this steak is sometimes called a breakfast steak = wafer steak = sandwich steak = minute steak.   Substitutes:  top blade steak OR top sirloin OR round tip steak

London broil   Notes:  This is the name of a finished dish, not a cut of meat, but butchers sometimes assign the name "London broil" to the following cuts:  flank steak, top round steak, or top blade steak.  Each would work well in a London broil recipe.  

top round steak = London broil = butterball steak  Notes:  These are thick steaks cut from the top round.    They're usually broiled, braised, or cooked in a liquid.  A London broil is name of a finished dish, but this cut is sometimes given that name. Substitutes:  flank steak (This is the traditional cut used for a London broil.) OR round steak

 

round steak  Notes:   Round steaks are very lean, but they're not as tender and juicy as other cuts.  They're usually broiled, braised, or cooked in a liquid.   Substitutes:  top round steak (similar, but just a bit thicker)

round tip roast = tip roast = sirloin tip roast = tip sirloin roast     Notes:   This roast is just a cut away from the sirloin, so it's tender enough to be oven roasted or cut up into kabobs.  If the roast is trimmed of some fat and muscle, it's called a trimmed tip roast = ball tip roast.    Substitutes:  tri-tip roast OR rump roast 

round tip steak  Notes:   This is a steak cut from an untrimmed round tip roast.  If the steak is cut from a trimmed roast, it's called a trimmed tip steak = ball tip steak.  If you first marinate them overnight, you can grill, broil, or pan-fry these steaks.  If not, your best bet is to braise them or cut them into stew meat.   Substitutes:  top blade steak OR top sirloin OR eye round steak

rump roast   Notes:   This is cut from the bottom round.  A rump roast with the bone left in is called a standing rump roast.  Some people roast these in the oven, but they're a bit tough and work better as pot roasts.    Substitutes:  bottom round roast OR arm roast OR shoulder roast

top round roast   Notes:   This is a fairly tender piece of meat compared to other cuts from the round section.  It's also one of the leanest.  A thick steak cut from a top round roast is called a top round steak, while a thinner steak is simply called a round steak.   Substitutes:   round tip roast OR flank steak

 


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