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Beef Chuck

Synonyms:  beef shoulder

The chuck section comes from the shoulder and neck of the beef, and it yields some of the most flavorful and economical cuts of meat.  The downside is that these cuts tend to be tough and fatty, and they have more than their fair share of bone and gristle.  It's usually best to cook them slowly in a liquid.  


Cuts:

7-bone pot roast = 7-bone roast = center cut pot roast = chuck roast center cut  Notes:   This is a tough cut of meat, so it's usually braised or cooked in liquid to tenderize it.  A steak from this roast is called a 7-bone steak Substitutes:  arm roast OR blade pot roast

7-bone steak = center chuck steak  Notes:  This is an economical steak cut from a 7-bone pot roast.  It's rather tough, so your best bet is to braise it.  If you insist on grilling or broiling it, be sure to marinate it overnight to make it as tender as possible.  Substitutes:  top blade steak OR under blade steak

arm roast = arm pot roast = arm chuck roast = chuck arm roast = round bone pot roast = round bone roast    Notes:    This is just a butcher's blade away from the shoulder roast, and the main difference between the two is that the arm roast has a round bone in it and is slightly more tender.  You can use this for a pot roast, or cut it up for stew meat, but it's too tough to cook with dry heat.  A steak cut from this roast is called an arm steak.   Substitutes:  shoulder roast OR bottom round OR cross rib roast 

arm steak = arm chuck steak = arm Swiss steak = round bone steak = round bone Swiss steak  Notes:  This is a steak cut from an arm roast.  It's too tough to grill or broil, but it's very tasty if you braise it.  Substitutes:  7-bone steak OR under blade steak OR shoulder steak

blade roast = blade pot roast = blade chuck roast  Notes:   This makes a good pot roast, but it's too tough to cook using dry heat.  Substitutes:  arm pot roast OR cross rib roast OR brisket

chuck eye = mock tender = chuck fillet = chuck filet = chuck tender = Scotch tender  Notes:  This is one of the more tender cuts from the chuck section, so you can cook it in liquid or roast it in the oven.  A steak cut from this roast is called a chuck eye steak.   Substitutes:  top blade roast

 

chuck eye steak = chuck fillet steak = chuck filet steak = beauty steak = chuck tender steak = fish steak  Notes:   This steak isn't bad, considering it's a chuck steak.   In fact, it's tender enough to grill or broil, provided that you marinate it overnight first.   Substitutes:   top blade steak OR eye of round steak OR top sirloin OR round tip steak

chuck steak  Notes:   Chuck steaks comes from the neck and shoulder of the beef, and they tend to be chewy but flavorful and inexpensive.  Most of them are too tough to grill, broil, or pan-fry--it's better to braise them or cut them up as stew meat.  If you must grill one, make sure you marinate it overnight first.   Substitutes:  round steak (leaner) OR T-bone steak (more tender)

 

 

cross rib roast = cross rib pot roast = Boston cut = English cut roast = English roast = thick rib roast = bread and butter cut = beef chuck cross rib pot roast   Notes:  If boneless, this is sometimes called an English roll.  This makes a fine pot roast, but it's too tough to roast with dry heat.  Substitutes:  arm roast OR blade pot roast OR 7-bone roast

 

 

pot roast  Notes:  These are economical roasts that are too tough to be oven roasted, but they become tender if cooked in a liquid for several hours.  Several cuts work well as pot roasts, particularly the 7-bone pot roast, arm roast, blade roast, chuck eye, cross rib roast, shoulder roast, top blade pot roast, under blade pot roast, bottom round roast, eye round roast, and rump roast.

shoulder roast = shoulder pot roast = English roast   Notes:   This boneless cut is located right behind the arm roast on the carcass.  It's rather tough, so it's usually cooked in a liquid.   Substitutes:  arm roast OR bottom round OR cross rib roast

shoulder steak = English steak = clod steak  Notes:  This makes for a fairly tough steak, but you can grill or broil it provided that you first marinate it overnight.  It's even better braised.  Substitutes:  top blade steak OR chuck eye steak

top blade pot roast = flat iron roast = lifter roast = puff roast = triangle roast  Notes:  This is both literally and figuratively a cut above the tougher under blade pot roast.  Meat from the top blade often is made into a pot roast, or cut up, marinated, and used for fajitas.  A steak cut from the top blade pot roast is called a top blade steak.  Substitutes:  7-bone pot roast OR under blade pot roast

top blade steak = book steak = butler steak = lifter steak = petite steak = top chuck steak = flat iron steak   Notes:   Though a lowly chuck steak, this cut is tender enough to grill, broil, or pan-fry, as long as you marinate it first.  If you don't mind cutting around some gristle, this is an economical and flavorful steak.  It's also great for making fajitas.   Substitutes:  eye of round steak OR top sirloin OR round tip steak

under blade pot roast = bottom chuck roast = California roast = under-cut roast  Notes:    This cut is tougher than a top blade pot roast, but it's flavorful and economical. It makes a fine pot roast, but it's too tough to roast with dry heat.  A steak cut from this is called an under blade steak.   Substitutes:  7-bone pot roast OR top blade pot roast

under blade steak = bottom chuck steak = California steak  Notes:  This is a steak cut from an under blade roast.  It's not tender enough to grill, broil, or fry, but it's quite flavorful if braised.   Substitutes:  top blade steak (more tender) OR arm steak


Copyright 1996-2005  Lori Alden